August212014
theenergyissue:

The Energy Report: The Guide to 100% Renewable Energy by 2050
An illustrated report produced by the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF) and AMO, the research wing of the architecture office OMA, presents a provocative scenario set in 2050 of a world run entirely on renewable energy. Two years in the making, the report features features maps, charts and images produced by AMO, and is bundled with a numbers-rich study by energy consultancy Ecofys. The Energy Report is unique in the way it combines rigorous scientific research and statistics with beautiful and evocative graphics, illustrating the way energy issues can—and should—be made accessible and engaging to a wider audience. The full report is available for download here.

theenergyissue:

The Energy Report: The Guide to 100% Renewable Energy by 2050

An illustrated report produced by the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF) and AMO, the research wing of the architecture office OMA, presents a provocative scenario set in 2050 of a world run entirely on renewable energy. Two years in the making, the report features features maps, charts and images produced by AMO, and is bundled with a numbers-rich study by energy consultancy Ecofys. The Energy Report is unique in the way it combines rigorous scientific research and statistics with beautiful and evocative graphics, illustrating the way energy issues can—and should—be made accessible and engaging to a wider audience. The full report is available for download here.

August182014
theenergyissue:

Nature vs. The Internet: How Google Protects Its Undersea Cables from Shark Attacks
Footage from a recent survey of Google’s undersea fiber-optic cables revealed that shark bites are a very real threat to global telecommunications. Indeed, a Google spokesperson noted that the company actually coats its cables in a Kevlar-like material to protect against sharks. Interestingly, sharks seem to have more of a taste for fiber-optic cables than the old-fashioned coaxial copper wires. A report from the United Nations Environment Programme and International Cable Protection Committee Ltd. speculates that sharks may be "encouraged by electromagnetic fields from a suspended cable strumming in currents." In other words, sharks, which can sense electromagnetic fields, may mistake the cables for live prey. The phenomenon highlights the ways in which technology and nature can intersect, and the strange new interconnections between the energy of the natural world and our man-made grids. 

I learned more in this post about Sharks then I did all week on the discovery channel

theenergyissue:

Nature vs. The Internet: How Google Protects Its Undersea Cables from Shark Attacks

Footage from a recent survey of Google’s undersea fiber-optic cables revealed that shark bites are a very real threat to global telecommunications. Indeed, a Google spokesperson noted that the company actually coats its cables in a Kevlar-like material to protect against sharks. Interestingly, sharks seem to have more of a taste for fiber-optic cables than the old-fashioned coaxial copper wires. A report from the United Nations Environment Programme and International Cable Protection Committee Ltd. speculates that sharks may be "encouraged by electromagnetic fields from a suspended cable strumming in currents." In other words, sharks, which can sense electromagnetic fields, may mistake the cables for live prey. The phenomenon highlights the ways in which technology and nature can intersect, and the strange new interconnections between the energy of the natural world and our man-made grids. 

I learned more in this post about Sharks then I did all week on the discovery channel

(Source: popsci.com)

8PM
August172014
August152014
August102014

knightscrest:

officialnasa:

knightscrest:

knightscrest:

how do astronauts say they’re sorry?

they apollo-gize!!

We dont apologize.

we are perfect.

nasa i know of at least 2 exploded spaceships that beg to differ

(via anderson-coopers-cats)

August62014

cygnu-s:

Women of National Geographic

Jane Goodall - studied chimpanzees and has created community-centered conservation programs that not only protect chimpanzees of Gombe National Park in Tanzania, but also take into account the needs of the people crucial to their protection

Hayat Sindi - created low-tech diagnostic tools to aid in the improvement of healthcare in the world’s poorest communities, has a Cambridge University Ph.D. in biotechnology

Kakenya Ntaiya - teacher building the first school for girls in her rural Kenyan village, refuses to accept Maasai woman’s traditionally subservient role, hopes that expanding education and leadership opportunities for girls will also improve life for the entire village

Nalini Nadkarni - uses mountain climbing gear to climb into the rainforest canopies of Costa Rica and researches the threats of global warming

Sarah McNair-Landry - youngest person to ski to the South Pole, sledged to the North Pole, and crossed ~1,400 miles of the Greenland ice cap to draw attention to the dangers of global warming

Dian Fossey - studied endangered gorillas in the Virunga Volcanoes of Rwanda, her devotion to their care and protection cost her her life and she was probably murdered by poachers who she fought relentlessly.

I hope that one day I can be added to this list of incredible and inspiring women.

Photographs by Hugo Van Lawick, Kris Krug, Philip Scott Andrews, Michael and Patricia Fogden, John Stetson, Robert I. M. Campbell

(via science-junkie)

August42014

theenergyissue:

State of the Art: the Evolution of the Computer Chip

Published less than three decades after the first integrated circuit ever produced, Stan Augarten’s State of the Art (1983) demonstrates how rapidly the new technology developed. In a comprehensive survey ranging from the first integrated circuit of 1958a clumsy-looking, yet ground-breaking deviceto American Microsystems’ sleek S4535 High-Voltage Driver produced in 1982, the book presents computer chips like works of art, aesthetic icons of the nascent digital revolution. Perhaps most notable is the way the technology quickly evolved out of human hands and into a complex mechanized process requiring precision at an atomic level. Indeed, Jack S. Kilby built the first integrated circuit in the summer of 1958 at Texas Instruments by hand. But his groundbreaking solution, which eliminating the need for individual discrete components by making a “monolithic” circuit from one material, allowed for automation to soon take over. Today the most advanced circuits contain several hundred millions of components on an area no larger than a fingernail and must be manufactured under highly delicate conditions. Laid bare as objects, their mysterious hieroglyphics seem to reveal the intricate, arcane processes that produced them. 

July302014
6PM

ADVENTURE

an unusual and exciting, typically hazardous, experience or activity.

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